> Oceanography > Issues > Archive > Volume 21, Number 1

2008, Oceanography 21(1):30–45, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2008.65

Evolution of North Atlantic Water Masses Inferred
from Labrador Sea Salinity Series

Authors | Abstract | Full Article | Citation







Authors

Igor Yashayaev | Ocean Circulation Section, Ocean Sciences Division, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS, Canada

Allyn Clarke | Ocean Circulation Section, Ocean Sciences Division, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS, Canada

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Abstract

The Labrador Sea is the coldest and freshest basin of the North Atlantic. Winter cooling in this sea produces Labrador Sea Water. This intermediate water plays an important role in the exchange of heat, freshwater, and other substances between the atmosphere and the abyssal ocean, affecting the water masses, circulation, and, ultimately, climate of the subpolar North Atlantic basins. The subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic has exhibited large changes in temperature, salinity, and volume over the past six decades, largely in response to changing winter conditions over the Labrador Sea. The signature of these changes can be seen in the lower limb of the Meridional Overturning Circulation down into the North Atlantic tropics.

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Full Article

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Citation

Yashayaev, I., and A. Clarke. 2008. Evolution of North Atlantic water masses inferred from Labrador Sea salinity series. Oceanography 21(1):30–45, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2008.65.

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