Oceanography The Official Magazine of
The Oceanography Society
Volume 24 Issue 02

View Issue TOC
Volume 24, No. 2
Pages 8 - 12

OpenAccess

RIPPLE MARKS • A River Runs Through It: Catwalk to a Heron Rookery | The Wind By Any Other Name: Inuit Observations Reveal Changes in Weather Variability | The Landscape (and Seascape) Have a Heartbeat: To Hear It, "Soundscape Ecologists" Spawn New Field

Cheryl Lyn Dybas
First Paragraph

A River Runs Through It: Catwalk to a Heron Rookery

The first rays of sunlight steal across Virginia's James River near a jumble of rocks known as Pipeline Rapids. On a road above the roiling waters of the James, biologists pull into a small gravel parking lot off 12th and Byrd Streets in Richmond. At this pre-dawn hour, theirs is the only car.

The Wind By Any Other Name: Inuit Observations Reveal Changes in Weather Variability

Ugjunguaq. Nirliviliit. Kananasiktu.

They may not sound like the words of science. But in fact they are.

They are terms the Inuit of Nunavut, Canada, and other far northern places use to describe weather. What they convey, it turns out, is more reliable than the most sophisticated weather model.

The Landscape (and Seascape) Have a Heartbeat: To Hear It, "Soundscape Ecologists" Spawn New Field

Geophony. Biophony. Anthrophony.

Unfamiliar words. But they shouldn't be. We are surrounded by them morning, noon, and night, says ecologist Bryan Pijanowski of Purdue University.

Citation

Dybas, C.L. 2011. Ripple marks—The story behind the story. Oceanography 24(2):8–12, https://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2011.41.

Copyright & Usage

This is an open access article made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution, and reproduction in any medium or format as long as users cite the materials appropriately, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate the changes that were made to the original content. Images, animations, videos, or other third-party material used in articles are included in the Creative Commons license unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If the material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission directly from the license holder to reproduce the material.